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Hello Koi Enthusiasts!

This blog is here to provide a spot for various things that do or might pertain to Koi. This stuff is intended for your entertainment, and is not meant to meet the stricter standards of our ebooks and courses, so use this info carefully and at your own risk. The short articles here may be descriptions of techniques that have proved effective, an introduction to new fish research, facts, graphs or just something FUN about fish! This information can be a springboard for your imagination and an entertaining place to learn something new. Information that was first published in Question of the Week can be found here.

The more we learn about Koi, the more FUN this hobby is - and we always say - if you're not havin' FUN, you're not doin' it right!

A short, but very interesting study in ammonia eating bacteria, and how frequency of feeding affects ammonia rates in water.  
 
..."Feeding leads to a peak in the ammonia production. For the symbiosis between fish and bacteria, it is better if the ammonia production is more constant. It is therefore better to feed often with small amounts than with large amounts once or twice a day. The bacteria -- and therefore the fish -- benefit from this feeding tactic. Nearly all organisms benefit from constancy."
 

A noted downside to keeping both koi and goldfish together. 
 
The eye-attacking behaviour of Koi fishes was recorded in a koi–goldfish polyculture system. The attacked fishes suffered from eye ablation, abnormal swimming and suppressed feeding behaviour. There was a significant difference in mean sizes of victims and attackers but the exact motivating stimuli for the observed action was not clear. For future research, the effects of different stocking ratios on aggressive behaviour of koi should also be examined.
 

Scientific research about swimbladder disorder for koi.  So for our very scientific minded koi lovers, this one is for you. 
 

Humans have been the only known species to domesticate other animals - until now. 
 
(picture credit:The Smithsonian’s Carrie Bow Cay Marine Research Station off the coast of Belize.Rohan Brooker)
 
In our new study, we describe what appears to be first example of a non-human vertebrate domesticating another animal...

A research paper on the reflective properties of koi scale and skin. A must read for our research minded members!
 

A short article on koi and what they have come to represent.
 

This is a superb article on koi as depicted in art in both China and Japan. Learn about how the koi symbolize life differently in both cultures. 
 

A great article on the basics of koi reproduction in your pond.
 
...It takes approximately a year for eggs to fully develop within the female koi. Eggs formed in the spring of the first year will be dropped in the spring of the following year. The eggs produced by the female are not fertile. The male of the species releases sperm onto the eggs after the female has dropped them. After the spawning has taken place, new eggs will begin to form. These eggs will be released during the next year's spawning.
 

So how did we really get the most common ornamental fish in the world?  Scientists are working to figure it out. This article is for all you research lovers!
 

The amazing powers of bioflim and it's future potental.
 
Researchers have demonstrated that a slimy, yet tough, type of biofilm that certain bacteria make for protection and to help them move around can also be used to separate water and oil. The material may be useful for applications such as cleaning contaminated waters.
 
Bacterial film separates water from oil (phys.org)

Its been coming, fish food without the fish. 
 
Dartmouth scientists have created a more sustainable feed for aquaculture by using a marine microalga co-product as a feed ingredient. The study is the first of its kind to evaluate replacing fishmeal with a co-product in feed designed specifically for Nile tilapia.
 
Story link: Making aquafeed more sustainable: Scientists develop feeds using a marine microalga co-product (phys.org)

Amazing research about damselfish domesticating shrimp!
 
...Now, researchers have discovered fish that seem to be using shrimp in the same way we would use a farm animal.
The team thinks it could be the first example of a vertebrate species – other than human – domesticating another animal.
 
Story link: These fish may have 'domesticated' shrimp staff to help them farm algae - Science Daily Press

This is the lightweight version of this research. If you want to read the scientific paper use link below. 
 
A large team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in China has sequenced the genomes of a large number of goldfish and carp, revealing much of their shared origin. They've published their results in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Okay, ready or not, this gal dined on her pet koi.
 
When Malaysian freelance travel guide Amanda Omeychua made dinner on Sunday, she did not expect her meal to attract international attention. The 26-year-old's recipe for turning her dead pet koi into soup has rocked social media, amassing thousands of views and comments expressing varying degrees of incredulity.

Okay, are you ready for a dish of carp, it may soon be on the menu!
 

"To us in America, we think of carp as a bottom-feeding, muddy-tasting fish, which it is sometimes," Dirk Fucik, the owner of Dirk's Fish and Gourmet Shop in Chicago, told the outlet. "But Asian carp is a plankton-feeder. It's a different type of flesh—much cleaner, sweeter-tasting meat."

Okay, which of your koi have the behaviors associated with effective leadership?
 
Good leaders needing to strike a balance between striving to reach goals and keeping their followers with them has deep evolutionary roots, according to a new study from the Universities of Bristol, Harvard and Princeton on schooling fish.

Fish and humans are similiar when in risky situations
 
New research carried out by scientists at the University of Bristol has shown that despite individual animals having their own personality, this gets suppressed when they make decisions together in a group.
Dr Christos Ioannou and his colleagues from the School of Biological Sciences tested three spined sticklebacks (the UK's smallest ) alone and in groups of ten.

Fish in space, a great article about fish research and viability of fish in space.

The seabass eggs, all 200 of them, were settled in their module and ready to go. The ground crew had counted the eggs carefully, checked each for an embryo, and sealed them tightly within a curved dish filled precisely to the brim with seawater.
The countdown, and then—ignition! For two full minutes, the precious eggs suffered a riotous shaking as the rocket’s engines exploded to life, followed by another eight minutes of heightened juddering as they ascended to the heavens.

This story will have me observing my koi's swimming patterns much more as I carefully for personaliy.
The way a fish swims reveals a lot about its personality, say scientists

For those looking for more scientific reading on the risks spreading pathogens for farmed fish to wild populations:
 

Research on viral infections in aquaculture: 
 

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!If you're not havin' FUN, you're not doin' it right


 

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