Research & Technology - Technology & Research from or relating to Koi/Fish, Tools Used

PSYCHOLOGIST Richard Wiseman’s taste for quirky science is well known, so his pet personality project should come as no surprise. In an online survey, he asked people to rate their pets for things like friendliness and neuroticism. Over half of fish owners said their watery friends had a good sense of humour. Fish apparently appreciate a joke more than cats, horses and birds – but not as much as dogs. Reptiles entirely fail to see the funny side of things, according to their owners.

Our fish just might be lonely and sad without us!
Fish at a popular aquarium in Australia have begun to show signs of depression after the facility was closed to the public in mid-March due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Our fish just might be lonely and sad without us!
Fish at a popular aquarium in Australia have begun to show signs of depression after the facility was closed to the public in mid-March due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Our fish friends have super powers:

 

Scientists found the fish can regrow body parts, including retinas. Damage to cells in the retina, light sensitive tissue at the back of the eye, is one of the most common causdes of blindness. The fish can repair the optic nerve carrying vital information to the brain in just a week.

 

While this study focuses on salt-water fish, there are implications for all fish keeping.

Scientists have recently discovered that a structure in a fish's inner ear records their metabolic rate.

Have you ever wondered about fish blood and it's components?  The following 2 studies are about platelets (thrombocytes).  Platelets not only facilitate blood clotting, but also provide an important protective barrier, and can be used to determine the age of the Koi.

For those of you that might be interested, I am posting a study done in the Czech Republic in 2007 about testing Koi for KHV.  They too conclude that the best option is prevention!  Scroll down to read the article...

Copper is ubiquitous in our environment - from pesticides to pipe.  Some copper gets into our ponds and this study shows how even small amounts affect Koi in many damaging ways.  This study goes into great detail to show the effects on the brain, blood, liver, gills, and kidneys based on very low exposure to copper.

This study evaluates the toxic residual pharmaceuticals in the water as they affect algae, the environment and fish.  The results indicate that there are numerous other external factors that complicate the testing.  An interesting study, not directly related to our Koi, but certainly affecting our water sources.  The list of chemicals they tested for is staggering!

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!If you're not havin' FUN, you're not doin' it right


 

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